It Is SO Hot!

Phew! It is so hot! Below are books for both younger and older children describing hot summer weather and heat waves. What to do when it is hot, why it is hot, and how to stay safe are some of the topics explored.

* All descriptions are from the publishers

Disaster Zone: Heat Waves by Vanessa Black (also available as a Read-Along ebook)

Part of the Disaster Zones Series

In Heat Waves, early fluent readers learn about the conditions that lead to and result from catastrophic heat waves. Vibrant, full-color photos and carefully leveled text will engage young readers as they learn about the deadliest heat waves and how to stay safe in heat wave conditions.

An infographic illustrates how a heat wave forms, and an activity offers kids an opportunity to extend discovery. Children can learn more about heat waves using our safe search engine that provides relevant, age-appropriate websites. Heat Waves also features reading tips for teachers and parents, a table of contents, a glossary, and an index.

Weather in Summer by Maddie Spalding

Part of the Welcome, Summer! Series

Engage readers with the story of weather in summer. Readers are introduced to the ways that Earth changes in the summertime. Additional features include a table of contents, a phonetic glossary, an index, an introduction to the author, and sources for further research. A kid-friendly project inspires creativity and hands-on fun.

On a Hot Day by Donna Herweck Rice

Part of the My Words Readers Series

Sprinklers, sunglasses, lemonade, and ice cream. These are all things that we use when it’s hot out! Perfect for 1st grade students, this book teaches these 7 high-frequency words from Fry’s First 100 words list: who, can, use, some, on, this, and day. The short sentences and clear images support the text to help with memorization. The rebus pictures and simple text build grade 1 reading comprehension in a format that is appealing to children. Beginning readers will learn the essential sight words and gain confidence as they learn to read independently.

Adapting to Severe Heat Waves by Tamra B. Orr

Part of the Science to the Rescue: Adapting to Climate Change Series

Like a row of dominoes, persistent and repetitive heat waves also threaten the environment, exacerbate current climate-related problems, stress a country’s health system, damage its infrastructure, and strain its energy resources. Readers examine efforts, including drought and heat-resistant energy-efficient “smart” homes and buildings, green roof gardens, next-generation building materials, and alternative energy sources as well as technologically advanced climate modeling, weather prediction, and emergency warning systems. Also highlighted are governmental efforts that can be made to alleviate human suffering, including energy conservation initiatives, the opening of public shelters and cooling centers, and the organizing of neighborhood watch programs for heat-vulnerable residents. Most importantly, readers learn how they can learn to reduce their carbon footprint while also coping with increasing heat and remaining healthy.

How’s the Weather in Summer? by Rebecca Felix

Part of the 21st Century Basic Skills Library: Let’s Look at Summer Series

This Level 1 guided reader explores the concept of seasonal changes in weather in the summer. Students will develop word recognition and reading skills while learning about the changes in summer weather we can see and feel.

Why is Summer Hot? by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfelf

Have you ever wondered why the days are so long in the summer and short in the winter? Or why we have hot weather and colder weather? Read on to learn about the Earth, how it spins around the Sun, and the seasons!

If you need to cool down now, take a look at this post about swimming books.

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