You Can Begin Returning Library Items To Book Returns Today!

As of Monday, June 29th, the Abbot Public Library is pleased to announce that we will be accepting returns of library items charged out before the Library closed in March.

Returns will be accepted Mondays through Saturdays. Please note: the library will be unable to accept returns on Friday, July 3rd or Saturday, July 4th, due to the Independence Day holiday.

Please return items to the outdoor book drops only, located outside of the library on Pleasant Street. If you have borrowed an item that will not fit in the book return, such as a children’s backpack kit or bookclub bag, please call the library at (781) 631-1481 between 2:00 pm – 5:45 pm Monday through Saturday to make arrangements to return the item.

Return items
to outdoor
book returns
Mondays through
Saturdays

Please note that we are unable to accept any book donations at this time.

All returned library materials will be quarantined to eliminate the potential for the spread of the coronavirus. Returned items will be checked in after the quarantine period, and, therefore, may continue to appear on your library account during this time. In view of this new system, the library will not be charging overdue fines.

No fines!

While we are looking forward to having library items come home, please do not feel obligated to return items immediately. The current due date for items already checked out is Monday, July 20th. The  purpose of this extended due date, along with the removal of overdue fines, is to encourage everyone to return items when it feels safest for you to do so. If you have been waiting to get rid of those library books since March, feel free to return them on June 29th — if you would like to hold onto them for a while longer, we encourage that as well.

Beginning on Monday, July 6th, Abbot Public Library will also begin to offer a curbside pickup service. Please read the full details about this service here.

“Find Your Place” on the Abbot App Map

April 19-25 is National Library Week! This year’s theme is “Find Your Place at the Library,” which was chosen before COVID-19 forced us all to close the doors of our physical spaces. But, you can still find your place in the library! Libraries across the country have been dedicated to providing more online resources—ebooks, movies, music, virtual story times, programs, and more. Help us celebrate by diving into our virtual world!

This “app map” shows the ways you can enjoy the Abbot Public Library’s e-collections! You can access all of these by downloading the Libby, RB Digital, and hoopla apps here or in your device’s app store, or by clicking the buttons on the eBooks, Movies, and More! page to read, watch, or listen from your computer!

Books About Libraries and Librarians

In honor of National Library Week, this digital display is dedicated to books about libraries, library history, the role libraries play in people’s lives, the cultural and social importance of libraries, and the future of libraries. These are books that celebrate libraries and librarians.

The Public Library: A Photographic Essay by Robert Dawson

Beautiful photographs of library buildings and spaces are accompanied by essays, poetry, and letters by the most distinguished American authors in Robert Dawson’s photographic essay.

The Library Book by Various Authors

The Library Book is a collection of essays, memoirs, and short stories by Alan Bennett, Tom Holland, Lionel Shriver and other famous writers, and their library-related thoughts.

The Library Book by Susan Orlean

A critically acclaimed book by Susan Orlean chronicles a fire disaster at the Los Angeles library. She explores the evolution of a library as an institution and its role in society.

NYT praised it as “exquisitely written and consistently entertaining.”

Burning the Page: The eBook Revolution and the Future of Reading by Jason Merkoski

This book about the digital book format and the future of libraries was written by a member of the team that launched Amazon Kindle devices.


Fiction Books Related To Libraries and Librarians

*descriptions are from the publisher.

The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes

Alice Wright marries handsome American Bennett Van Cleve hoping to escape her stifling life in England. But small-town Kentucky quickly proves equally claustrophobic, especially living alongside her overbearing father-in-law. So when a call goes out for a team of women to deliver books as part of Eleanor Roosevelt’s new traveling library, Alice signs on enthusiastically. The leader, and soon Alice’s greatest ally, is Margery, a smart-talking, self-sufficient woman who’s never asked a man’s permission for anything. They will be joined by three other singular women who become known as the Horseback Librarians of Kentucky. What happens to them–and to the men they love–becomes a classic drama of loyalty, justice, humanity, and passion.

The Alexandria Link by Steve Barry

Cotton Malone retired from the high-risk world of elite operatives for the U.S. Justice Department to lead the low-key life of a rare-book dealer. But his quiet existence is shattered when he receives an anonymous email: “You have something I want. You’ re the only person on earth who knows where to find it. Go get it. You have 72 hours. If I don’t hear from you, you will be childless.” His horrified ex-wife confirms that the threat is real: Their teenage son has been kidnapped. When Malone’s Copenhagen bookshop is burned to the ground, it becomes brutally clear that those responsible will stop at nothing to get what they want. And what they want is nothing less than the lost Library of Alexandria.

The Library of Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick

Librarian Martha Storm has always found it easier to connect with books than people—though not for lack of trying. She keeps careful lists of how to help others in her superhero-themed notebook. And yet, sometimes it feels like she’s invisible.

All of that changes when a book of fairy tales arrives on her doorstep. Inside, Martha finds a dedication written to her by her best friend—her grandmother Zelda—who died under mysterious circumstances years earlier. When Martha discovers a clue within the book that her grandmother may still be alive, she becomes determined to discover the truth. As she delves deeper into Zelda’s past, she unwittingly reveals a family secret that will change her life forever.

Summer Hours at the Robbers Library by Sue Halpern

People are drawn to libraries for all kinds of reasons. Most come for the books themselves, of course; some come to borrow companionship. For head librarian Kit, the public library in Riverton, New Hampshire, offers what she craves most: peace. Here, no one expects Kit to talk about the calamitous events that catapulted her out of what she thought was a settled, suburban life. She can simply submerge herself in her beloved books and try to forget her problems.

But that changes when fifteen-year-old, home-schooled Sunny gets arrested for shoplifting a dictionary. The judge throws the book at Sunny—literally—assigning her to do community service at the library for the summer. Bright, curious, and eager to connect with someone other than her off-the-grid hippie parents, Sunny coaxes Kit out of her self-imposed isolation.

The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson

The hardscrabble folks of Troublesome Creek have to scrap for everything—everything except books, that is. Thanks to Roosevelt’s Kentucky Pack Horse Library Project, Troublesome’s got its very own traveling librarian, Cussy Mary Carter.

Cussy’s not only a book woman, however, she’s also the last of her kind, her skin a shade of blue unlike most anyone else. Not everyone is keen on Cussy’s family or the Library Project, and a Blue is often blamed for any whiff of trouble. If Cussy wants to bring the joy of books to the hill folks, she’s going to have to confront prejudice as old as the Appalachias and suspicion as deep as the holler.

The Borrower by Rebecca Makkai

Lucy Hull, a young Children’s Librarian in Hannibal, Missouri, is unsure where her life is headed. That becomes more than a figure of speech when her favorite patron, ten-year-old Ian Drake, runs away from home and Lucy finds herself in the surprise role of chauffeur. The precocious Ian is addicted to reading, but needs Lucy’s help to smuggle books past his overbearing mother, who has enrolled Ian in weekly antigay classes with celebrity Pastor Bob. Lucy stumbles into a moral dilemma when she finds Ian camped out in the library after hours with a knapsack of provisions and an escape plan. The odd pair embarks on a crazy road trip from Missouri to Vermont, with ferrets, an inconvenient boyfriend, and dubious family history thrown in their path. But who is actually running away? And from what? 

Do Unto Others by Jeff Abbott

After a few good years of city life, Jordan Poteet returns to his small hometown of Mirabeau, Texas, to work as a librarian. Yet his quet domesticity is shattered when he locks horns with Ms. Beta Harcher, the town’s prize religious fanatic, in a knock-down drag-out battle over censorship.

When Jordan finds her murdered body in the library, he learns that Beta dead is much more dangerous than she ever was alive. Not only for poor Jordy, whom the police are itching to throw the book at, but for countless others. In fact, thanks to a cryptic list the police find stashed next to her fanatical heart, Beta Harcher has the whole town in a death grip…

LeVar Burton Reads YA on Wednesdays

With everyone staying home and practicing social distancing, more and more authors and celebrities are stepping up to provide storytimes in the form of live streams to the social media platform of their choice. Most of these livestreams focus on children’s stories and children’s books. One celebrity, however, chose to spread his read-alouds across different age groups and interests. 

LeVar Burton, host of the book podcast LeVar Burton Reads, has taken to Twitter on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays to livestream storytimes for each age group. Mondays for children, Wednesdays for YA, and Fridays for adults. 

So sit back and enjoy a storytime for teens on Wednesdays at 6:00 pm on LeVar Burton’s Twitter, and even interact with other listeners if you have a Twitter account.

Interested in more YA books? Browse the library’s teen e-collections on hoopla and Overdrive, or on Overdrive’s Libby app!

Meet Libby: The One-Tap Reading App From Your Library

With Libby, you can browse, borrow, and enjoy eBooks, audiobooks, and magazines from your library without ever having to register for a new account! To start using Libby, all you need is an internet connection, a compatible device (iOS, Android, Windows 10+), and your library card number.

For full step-by-step instructions on how to use Libby, please feel free to click below to download the following PowerPoint presentation that one of our staff has created for you.

Visit Our Museums — Virtually!

Did you know: the Abbot Public Library offers free or reduced passes to fourteen of the Boston area’s best museums and attractions?

While these organizations are closed for the time being, they have been working hard behind-the-scenes to bring the museum experience to your home! We will be collecting fun activities and virtual tours created by museum staff and sharing them here with you, along with ways to get the most out of your virtual visit using the library’s digital services. In the meantime, please show our museum partners some love by visiting their websites and social media — there is a lot of wonderful content to find there!

To stay inspired and engaged at home, check out these websites: 

Boston by Foot

Boston Children’s Museum

Cape Ann Museum (our newest museum pass!)

deCordova Sculpture Park & Museum

Harvard Art Museums

The House of the Seven Gables

Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston

Arctic Fox at Stone Zoo

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum

Museum of Fine Arts

Museum of Science

New England Aquarium

Peabody Essex Museum

Zoo New England

Check back here to the Abbot Public Library Blog for other ways to use the library and to enjoy cultural institutions from home!

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Experience Daily Life in Marblehead’s Past by Exploring the Abbot Library’s Digital Archive!

Clippings from the October 4th, 1918 issue of the “Marblehead Messenger”

This notice from the October 4th, 1918 issue of the Marblehead Messenger is just one example of the fascinating discoveries you will make when you explore the Abbot Public Library’s Digital Archive

Here, you will be able to search for topics and names in all the issues of the Marblehead Messenger and Marblehead Reporter, from 1871 to 1976. 

Whether you are working on a family genealogy project, or wondering what life in Marblehead was like at specific times in history, looking at these newspapers will directly connect you with the stories and voices (and fun advertisements!) of Marblehead’s past.

The creation of this unmatched resource for Marblehead history was made possible by a generous grant from the Harold B. and Elizabeth L. Shattuck Memorial Fund.

(Please note: Because of copyright law, access to newspapers from 1977 to 2016 in the Digital Archive is available only inside the Library building.)

New Nonfiction eBooks and Audiobooks!

Many new nonfiction eBooks on a variety of subjects have been added recently. 

Here are descriptions of some of our latest acquisitions — titles included on the NYT or USA Today Bestseller lists. 

Particularly recommended are a couple of books that received wonderful reviews in The New York Times.

British author Julian Barnes is mostly known as a fiction writer; his work is highly valued and has brought him multiple literary awards. The Man in the Red Coat, his latest book, is a work of nonfiction: a biography of a French doctor, a distinguished physician and a very interesting figure who lived in France in the late 1800s and early 1900s. American artist John Singer Sargent considered him “a brilliant creature” and painted his portrait, which is on the cover of the book.

If you would like to read the review for this book — or any other book — in The New York Times, you can create a free account at the NYT website.

Another book you may want to consider is The Splendid and the Vile by Erik Larson, the bestselling author of such books as Devil in the White City, Dead Wake, and In the Garden of Beasts. This author is known for doing very deep research to create his characters, as well as historical settings of his narratives. His latest book is about the UK during World War II, with Winston Churchill, who led the country to victory, as the main character. 

This eBook is in demand, but do not hesitate to place a “hold”. Our library owns more than one digital copy, with quite a few copies owned by other libraries. As a member of this community, you have priority on copies purchased by our library, so your wait time will not be long.

Educated, a memoir by Tara Westover, and Sapiens: The Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari have been on various bestseller lists for years. If you did not have a chance to read them earlier, it is quite possible to do so now.

As always, we are open to your suggestions and will be glad to consider purchasing new titles. Feel free to leave recommendations in the comments below! 

Welcome Teens!

Welcome to the Teen Category! Under this category you will find book recommendations, games, resources, and more, all curated for teens in grades 7-12. Check back each week under this category for new posts, and thanks for visiting the Abbot Public Library Blog!

Also, check out the Abbot Library Teens Instagram!

Leave a comment under this post of what you would like to see featured or any questions you have for the Teen Librarian!

Register for a Library Card Online!

Did you know that any Marblehead resident who would like to register for a library card may do so, even while the Library is closed? Having a library card will allow you to access the Library’s electronic collections, which you can find on the eBooks, Movies, and More! page, as well as digital resources

If you know you have a library card already but can’t find it or don’t know the number, please email mar@noblenet.org for assistance.

If you need to register for a card, just fill out this online form as completely as possible, click “Submit Registration,” and a library staff member will be in touch with your new library card information! 

Your new temporary card number will be valid for two months (and this time period will be extended, as needed, until the Library re-opens), and it will grant Marblehead residents access to our wide array of digital services to enjoy from home! 

Once the library reopens, patrons with temporary barcodes may present a valid ID, which needs to include a current name and address, to pick up an official library card for full use of all library services.

Please contact the Library’s Circulation Coordinator at kuhlman@noblenet.org with any questions.